Concise legal writing — a rare example

Lawyers tend to overwrite. This cannot be said of Judge J.H. Gillis’s opinion in Denny v. Radar Industries, Inc., 184 N.W.2d 289 (Mich. App. 1970), reproduced in its entirety:

The appellant has attempted to distinguish the factual situation in this case from that in Renfroe v. Higgins Rack Coating and Manufacturing Co., Inc. (1969), 17 Mich.App. 259, 169 N.W.2d 326. He didn’t. We couldn’t.

Affirmed. Costs to appellee.

(A nitpicker might suggest replacing “factual situation” with “facts” and striking “in this case.” Otherwise, perfect.)

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About Guy N. Texas

Guy N. Texas is the pen name of a lawyer living in Dallas, who is now a liberal. He was once conservative, but this word has so morphed in meaning that he can no longer call himself that in good conscience. Guy has no political aspirations. He speaks only for himself.
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One Response to Concise legal writing — a rare example

  1. hortonw says:

    The facts of this case are indistinguishable from Renfroe v. Higgins Rack Coating and Manufacturing Co., Inc., 169 N.W.2d 326 (Mich. App. 1969).

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