Drew Westen is singing, but wrong notes are leading to bad reviews

By now some of you will have seen Drew Westen’s long New York Times piece criticizing the President from the viewpoint of the progressive left, entitled What Happened to Obama?. Many parts of it resonate, especially Westen’s point about the President’s missed rhetorical opportunities. For example:

When Barack Obama rose to the lectern on Inauguration Day, the nation was in tatters. Americans were scared and angry. The economy was spinning in reverse. Three-quarters of a million people lost their jobs that month. Many had lost their homes, and with them the only nest eggs they had. Even the usually impervious upper middle class had seen a decade of stagnant or declining investment, with the stock market dropping in value with no end in sight. Hope was as scarce as credit.

In that context, Americans needed their president to tell them a story that made sense of what they had just been through, what caused it, and how it was going to end. They needed to hear that he understood what they were feeling, that he would track down those responsible for their pain and suffering, and that he would restore order and safety. What they were waiting for, in broad strokes, was a story something like this:

“I know you’re scared and angry. Many of you have lost your jobs, your homes, your hope. This was a disaster, but it was not a natural disaster. It was made by Wall Street gamblers who speculated with your lives and futures. It was made by conservative extremists who told us that if we just eliminated regulations and rewarded greed and recklessness, it would all work out. But it didn’t work out. And it didn’t work out 80 years ago, when the same people sold our grandparents the same bill of goods, with the same results. But we learned something from our grandparents about how to fix it, and we will draw on their wisdom. We will restore business confidence the old-fashioned way: by putting money back in the pockets of working Americans by putting them back to work, and by restoring integrity to our financial markets and demanding it of those who want to run them. I can’t promise that we won’t make mistakes along the way. But I can promise you that they will be honest mistakes, and that your government has your back again.” A story isn’t a policy. But that simple narrative — and the policies that would naturally have flowed from it — would have inoculated against much of what was to come in the intervening two and a half years of failed government, idled factories and idled hands. That story would have made clear that the president understood that the American people had given Democrats the presidency and majorities in both houses of Congress to fix the mess the Republicans and Wall Street had made of the country, and that this would not be a power-sharing arrangement. It would have made clear that the problem wasn’t tax-and-spend liberalism or the deficit — a deficit that didn’t exist until George W. Bush gave nearly $2 trillion in tax breaks largely to the wealthiest Americans and squandered $1 trillion in two wars.

Westen’s fantasy speech is a bit over-the-top, but he is right about the President’s failure to “tell the story” of where we are, how we got here, why it’s an extraordinary time requiring an extraordinary response. He’s not done it. It’s not  completely clear that he even believes it.

Also Westen’s piece is inaccurate in enough ways to discredit it. Andrew Sprung has written a particularly good and specific take down, which  can be found here. Others will pile on soon, I suspect. Still, I am pleased Westen’s piece is out there. The Obama administration, it is now clear, needs to feel heat from its left in order to accurately chart the centrist path that seems to be the only one it is capable of taking.

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About Guy N. Texas

Guy N. Texas is the pen name of a lawyer living in Dallas, who is now a liberal. He was once conservative, but this word has so morphed in meaning that he can no longer call himself that in good conscience. Guy has no political aspirations. He speaks only for himself.
This entry was posted in Economic policy, Politics, Presidential rhetoric. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Drew Westen is singing, but wrong notes are leading to bad reviews

  1. Pingback: Answering Andrew Sullivan, a respected public intellectual who has succumbed to the Paradox of Thrift | Notes and Rests Make Music

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