Is House Republican extremism the last paroxysm of a dying movement?

The extreme nature of the House tea-party Republican’s bargaining position — e.g., insisting on a Constitutional amendment for locking in a balanced budget as a remarkably low percentage of GDP — makes a lot of sense as strategy for use by a faction of true believers who do not expect to be in power very long. Here’s a thoughtful reader email to Talking Points Memorandum that can be found on their site this morning:

“These groups [House tea-party Republicans] have repeatedly rejected deals that appear (to people like me) to have given them everything they have wanted, and more. The sticking point? At least without a balanced budget amendment, future Congresses might undo deals made in the present. But that is the essense of republican government — trusting future generations to govern themselves as we today govern ourselves. Seeking restrictions on future generations, at least on issues of spending and generating revenue, is to reject a central premise of republicanism — that experiment at each moment of a people governing itself as best it can.”

So true. Add to this (i) the hostility of many Republicans to immigration from south of the border, (ii) that Republican-controlled state legislatures have been making it more difficult (and more intimidating) for Hispanics, and blacks, and, in some cases, young adults to vote — and it seems to suggest they are trying to rig the game now, before demographic trends put them out to pasture for good, as they surely will.

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About Guy N. Texas

Guy N. Texas is the pen name of a lawyer living in Dallas, who is now a liberal. He was once conservative, but this word has so morphed in meaning that he can no longer call himself that in good conscience. Guy has no political aspirations. He speaks only for himself.
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